Location: Transition Gallery
Auction Times: 27 Nov 2010, 7-9pm
Viewing Times: 25-27 Nov, 12-6 pm

Online bidding: Now

 

ART BLITZ Insider Picks

We asked a series of art insiders to choose five pieces from ART BLITZ...

 

 

 

Claire Flannery from Artfeelers' Top 5

 

Andrew Curtis, Hills Hoist
Andrew Curtis’ work has come into my daily life so much lately that I feel like I’ve known it for a long time. This former cover of Garageland is quite different to his monkey puzzle suburban scenes and I like it for very different reasons. While his New Empire series are more of a blatant satire of the English suburb, this work is more subtle, dreamy and intriguing.

Caravan Gallery, Jan Williams & Chris Teasdale
When I met Jan and Chris a year or two ago I thought - they really make sense standing next to their wonderful little caravan that tells the truth about Britain. Fantastically insane in a way that makes sense of the hilarious madness around us, humble and utterly lovable.

Tom Hunter, Untitled, from the Phoenix to Vegas series
I find America a very interesting place… a place I love to hate and love to love at the same time — Tom Hunter
As there is nice quote here from Tom Hunter already – there’s no need to add to it really but what I would say is - Every time I see Hunter’s work I think this is the work of master and then I see the credit and think – oh it’s Tom Hunter again who lives in Hackney, just up the road from me, how cool. I’ve seen a lot of his photos of London; this is the first of America. It looks pretty perfect.

 

Emma Talbot, Russell Square
It’s hard to describe exactly why I like Emma Talbot’s drawing so much. I think, regardless of knowing the heart breaking back story, this work (from a series of similar, connected drawings) is so damn human and real and so removed from the  tripe mimics of this illustrative style who drip of empty or easy cynicism.

 

James Payne, Ben (From a series of portraits of male prostitutes)
The formal considerations and concept are tightly wrapped up as one in Ben. The pixels are represented by a tightly controlled hand and pencil. The tension is the type that keeps you looking and asking as James no doubt wants us to.

 

 

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