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Really: Painting and Photography
Paul Murphy  Jim Payne  Andy Swani  Carol Ann Wingrove  Yolanda Zappaterra

6 December 2002 – 5 January 2003 TRANSITION brings together five artists who investigate the idea of the representational and how we understand reality. Ranging from the historical convention of the still life - paintings of sardines, herring and mackerel – through to photographic based image and text works, REALLY presents a snapshot of the current state of the artist and audience’s encounters with reality through painting, printing and photography.

PAUL MURPHY'S
photographs examine the scenes and words that we already carry round with us. Like the detective returning to the scene of the crime, the images direct us to the evidence that was under our noses all along.
JAMES PAYNE'S latest piece of work is neither a photograph, a print, nor a painting, yet incorporates all of these disciplines. It is a process done in different stages with the starting point a photograph of a formal garden. The image is changed through several stages, digital manipulation, screen-printing, and painting.
ANDY SWANI paints sardines. Working with one eye on the fish in front of him and the other on the historical past and conventions, the fish series recalls the magical ability of paint to simultaneously show us the world while simply remaining no more than coloured pigment on a piece of board.
CAROL ANN WINGRAVE'S photographs of blind windows are a remnant of the window tax, they exist merely to enliven blank areas of wall, in some cases a trompe l’oeil effect was even created to give an added illusion. They give no clue as to their history and offer no view from the inside and no view from the outside.
YOLANDA ZAPATERRA'S series of photographs of prostitutes in Nice speaks of surveillance and the policing of desire. Looming out of the darkness of Nice’s main drag, shadowy portraits of the girls and their clients emerge.


Untitled - Paul Murphy